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Does the City of Roseville install sound walls along existing roads with a high volume of traffic?
The City no longer installs sound walls along major roadways. In 1987 the City's Planning Department established a criteria and identified subdivisions targeted for sound wall construction based on input from public workshops and meetings before the City Council. Through this process a "Sound Wall Priority List" was established and approved by the City Council in 1988. After the approval of the Sound Wall Priority List, the Public Works Department was charged to develop a sound wall construction project and to construct the sound walls at the locations approved by Council. However, per City Council direction in the mid 1990s, this program was discontinued since the General Fund funded it.
Phone: (916) 746-1300
Fax: (916) 746-1339
How can we get an existing sound wall raised or a new sound wall constructed along existing roadways and subdivisions?
Per City Council direction, the only available funding option for construction of sound walls would be the formation of an Assessment District. Basically, an Assessment District is a funding mechanism where the properties that would benefit from an improvement, pays for the improvement.
Phone: (916) 746-1300
Fax: (916) 746-1339
What happens after a sound wall is reported as damaged?
When the City's Public Works Department is notified that a sound wall is damaged, engineering staff will investigate the location of the sound wall to determine if the City is resonsible for repairs.
Phone: (916) 746-1300
Fax: (916) 746-1339
What is the criteria to determine the resonsibility for repairing a damaged sound wall?
Generally, the City will repair damaged sound walls that were constructed by the City or are in the City's right-of-way. Repairs to sound walls that do not meet the above criteria, are the responsibility of the adjoining property owners. However, each report of a damaged sound wall will be investigated on a case-by-case basis.
Phone: (916) 746-1300
Fax: (916) 746-1339
What happens after a public sidewalk is reported as damaged?
When the City of Roseville is notified that a sidewalk is damaged, the street maintenance division temporarily repairs it by placing asphalt on the separation to reduce the chance of tripping.
Phone: (916) 746-1300
Fax: (916) 746-1339
What is an "official city street tree" (OCST)?
OCSTs are planted and maintained by the City of Roseville. The trees grow between public walkways and street curbs or within the public right-of-way if no public walkway exists.
Phone: (916) 746-1300
Fax: (916) 746-1339
What sidewalks will the City repair?
According to City and State codes, the City is responsible for long-term repair of sidewalks damaged by OCSTs. If damage was caused by an OCST or a City vehicle, permanent repairs are scheduled into the annual sidewalk replacement project. If the sidewalk was damaged in any other manner, the property owner is responsible for repairing the sidewalk.
Phone: (916) 746-1300
Fax: (916) 746-1339
A traffic sign is broken, missing, or illegible
Contact the Street Maintenance Division of Public Works at (916) 774-5790. Please provide the location and damage assessment of the sign.
Are aerial photographs of the City available for viewing or purchase?
Yes, aerials are available for purchase.  For more information, contact our office at 916-774-5339.
Are parks and bike trails safe?
Roseville Police officers patrol parks and bike trails regularly. The Police Department will cite people if they are illegally camping within city limits, consuming alcohol in parks, or breaking any other law or city ordinance. It is not unlawful for people to congregate or be in a public park.

If you ever see evidence of people camping, drinking, fighting, or breaking other laws, or you see any other suspicious activity, call the Roseville Police Department at 911 for emergency situations or 774-5000 extension 1 for a non-emergency.

Phone: (916) 774-5000
Are shrubs at residential streets corners allowed to block motorists’ view?
No. The city ordinance requires a minimum of 30 feet from an intersection be clear of any shrub higher than two feet or a tree branch lower than eight feet. It is the responsibility of the property owner to keep this area clear. If a traffic accident occurs, the property owner could be held responsible if it is determined in court that the property owner’s failure to keep this area clear was a factor in the accident.
Can I build a secondary driveway on my property for an RV?
No, a second driveway is not permitted per our Improvement Standards but a widened primary driveway is acceptable with an encroachment permit.
Can I get copies of Improvement Plans or Maps?  Is there a fee for these items?
Improvement Plans and Maps are available for viewing at the Permit Center.  Copies can be made at a cost of $3.00 per sheet for 24” x 36” sheets.
Can I place a fence at the edge of the sidewalk?
Typically, a fence or retaining wall is permitted at the edge of the sidewalk but there are exceptions.  If the fence or wall is to be located with a public utility easement then an application for an encroachment permit must be submitted and reviewed for possible conflict with utilities. 
Do I have any easements on my property?  Where are they located?
To the extent available, Record Maps and Improvement Plans can be viewed at the Permit Center to determine locations of easements on a particular property.  If more information is required, you will be referred to the County Recorder’s Office or to a private title company.
Does the City allow street/cul-de-sac closures for the purpose of Block Parties?
No. Due to the need to maintain timely access for emergency response vehicles, the City does not allow street/cul-de-sac closures for the purpose of block parties.
Does the occurrence of a few traffic accidents at a particular location mean something should be changed?
Not necessarily. Accidents occur on a regular basis in otherwise perfect conditions, and the State publishes “expected accident rates” for various types of intersections and roadway segments. The accident rate at an intersection is the number of accidents per million vehicles entering the intersection.

When we evaluate the accident history of an intersection, we compare the “actual” accident rate to the “expected” accident rate.  If the actual rate is significantly and consistently higher (year after year) than the expected rate, then we look at engineering ways of reducing the actual rate.  Sometimes a new traffic signal will help to reduce the actual rate, although it is not uncommon for rear-end accidents to increase once a signal is installed.
During road construction, where do I park my car and how do I know when they will pave my street?
"No Parking" signs will be posted 48 hours prior to the street closures. The signs will include the exact work dates and times. We recommend that residents park their vehicles in their driveways overnight and move their cars to adjacent streets before the work begins in the morning.

Please do not drive on a new road for at least 6 hours after it has been paved.

Phone: (916) 746-1300
Fax: (916) 746-1339
How are fees and bonds determined?
  • Fees are calculated to be 5% of the approved engineer’s cost estimate for all public improvements, grading and erosion/sediment control for the project.  2 1/2% is due at initial plan submittal and the remaining 2 1/2% is due at plan approval.
  • The grading permit bond is calculated to be 10% of the approved engineer’s cost estimate for earthwork and erosion/sediment control.
  • The encroachment permit bond is calculated to be 100% of the approved engineer’s cost estimate of all public improvements.

     

How can I get a grocery cart picked up?
Call the Street Maintenance Division of Public Works at (916) 774-5790. They will have a crew remove the cart.
How can I rent a bike locker?
Twelve lockers are available free for public use as part of residents’ commute trip to work. Four lockers each are located at Maidu Park (1550 Maidu Drive), the park-and-ride lots, the Amtrak Station (201 Pacific Street), and the Taylor Road site (1853 Taylor Road).

To reserve a bike locker, call the department’s Transportation Division at (916) 774-5293.
How can my child get to school?
Local school districts provide school bus services. Please contact your child's local school about the programs and policies for school bus transportation.

Students are also welcome to use Roseville Transit Local service. Roseville Transit presently travels to all local high schools and many local middle schools. A complete listing of current stops and routes can be found in the Roseville Transit Bus Services Guide and online. Current laws prevent students from using Roseville Transit Dial-A-Ride services to go to and from school.

Students are eligible for a discounted student fare on Roseville Transit's Local service. Students must be age 5 - 18, or still in High School to qualify.

Phone: (916) 745-7560
How do I drive in a Roundabout?

Although roundabouts or traffic circles are relatively new to Roseville, they have been around for over 100 years.  Traffic signals became predominant in the 1950’s, but now traffic circles are making a big comeback with the push to reduce right angle collisions and calm traffic. Although they cannot be used at every location, they do have many benefits such as:

  • They keep traffic moving. This decreases emissions and improves fuel economy.
  • They increase safety because there is no stopping in a roundabout and no left turns are made across opposing traffic lanes.
  • They force vehicles to slow to a safe speed for the intersection.

Driving in a roundabout is quite simple.  As you approach the intersection, slow down and prepare to Yield to any vehicles currently within the roundabout.  Wait for a gap and merge right, traveling counterclockwise with moving traffic. Proceed around the circle until you reach your point of exit and signal your intent to other drivers.

Roundabout Safety Tips:

  • Roundabouts are always one-way-counterclockwise.
  • If you miss your turn continue around the circle again rather than swerving to make your exit.
  • Obey all traffic signs and road markings.
  • Always watch for pedestrians and bicycles.
How do I drive through a signal if it is out due to loss of electricity?
According to the California Vehicle Code, when a signalized intersection is blacked out due to a loss of power, all motorists must treat the intersection as an all-way stop.
How do I get a grading permit and what are the requirements?
A grading permit can be obtained at the Permit Center.  The grading permit application is also available on our website.  There may be fees or bonds required for the permit depending on the type of work that is to be done.
How do I get an encroachment permit and what are the requirements?
An encroachment permit can be obtained at the Permit Center.  The encroachment permit application is also available on our website.  There may be fees or bonds required for the permit depending on the type of work that is to be done. The applicant for the encroachment permit must provide proof of insurance to our Risk Management Department.
How do I get residential permit parking on my residential street?
The city has a residential permit parking program designed for residential streets where overflow parking from parks, schools, businesses, etc. continuously occurs in front of the homes. Residential permit parking is not approved for individual homes. The city will consider permit parking when the majority of the residents along a block support the request for permit parking. Residential permit parking requires approval of City Council. Once the permit parking is approved, each household is issued two permit placards by the Police Department. 
How do I report an obvious malfunction with an existing traffic signal?
If a traffic signal light bulb is out, has been knocked over, is stuck in red, or does not turn green for a particular direction, please call (916) 746-1300 during normal business hours.  Be sure to give the operator the intersecting streets, the direction of the problem, and a clear description of the problem.
How do I request a stop sign?
All requests for traffic control devices are to be submitted in writing using a "Traffic Study Request" form available at the Permit Center in the City of Roseville's Civic Center, or from this website (see link below). If, after reviewing the information on this website, you would like to request a form to be mailed to you, call the Engineering Division at (916) 746-1300 and request one or print the form located on this website. When we receive your written request, we will notify you that we have received it, and give you an estimate of time we think we will need to evaluate your request. Many requests require us to collect data, so it may take anywhere from a few months to a year to complete our evaluation, depending on the request. Requests are evaluated on a first come, first served basis, and we typically receive anywhere between 150 and 200 traffic study requests per year. So it may take a few months (depending on the backlog) from when we receive your request to when we begin working on it, because at the time you submit your request, we are already working on requests that were submitted months prior to your submittal.

Like nearly all cities in California, Roseville uses the Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (with California Supplement), also known as the MUTCD, to evaluate the appropriateness of traffic control devices for particular situations. The MUTCD contains guidelines or "warrants" for each type of traffic control device. The purpose of these warrants is to ensure consistency in the implementation of traffic control devices to conform to motorists’ expectations and achieve uniform driver behavior throughout the State of California. The warrants vary depending on what device is being considered. The warrants usually evaluate things like the volume of traffic, number of pedestrians, amount of travel delay, and the accident rate.
 
Stop signs are installed after stop sign warrants are met for a particular intersection. Stop sign warrants are based on traffic volumes, visibility, and the accident rate. Many people believe stop signs are the answer to controlling speeding along streets. Stop signs are not to be used as a speed control device, but to identify who has the right-of-way at an intersection. Studies have shown that when unwarranted stop signs are installed along a road, motorists soon realize that the stop signs are unnecessary, and begin to run the stop sign. This behavior could lead to an accident. Also, motorists tend to speed up after an unwarranted stop sign as they are frustrated having to stop or slow at what they feel is an unnecessary stop sign. In many cases, measured speeds have been higher between unwarranted stop signs than before the signs were installed.

How do I request an inspection for work within the City's right-of-way?
Call the assigned Public Works Inspector 48 hours prior to the needed inspection. You can contact your Public Works Inspector on their cell phone or call the Engineering Division of Public Works at (916) 774-5441.
How do I submit a traffic-related request?
Response: All requests for traffic studies are to be submitted in writing using a "Traffic Study Request" form available at the Engineering counter, or from the Traffic Operations web site. If, after reviewing the information on this website, you would like a request form mailed to you, call the Engineering Division at (916) 746-1300 and request one or print the form located on this website. When we receive your written request, we will notify you that we have received it, and give you an estimate of time we think we will need to evaluate your request. Many requests require us to collect data, so it may take anywhere from a few months to a year to complete our evaluation, depending on the request. Requests are evaluated on a first come, first served basis, and we typically receive anywhere between 150 and 200 traffic study requests per year. So it may take a few months (depending on the backlog) from when we receive your request to when we begin working on it, because at the time you submit your request, we are already working on requests that were submitted months prior to your submittal.

Like nearly all cities in California, Roseville uses the California Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices, also known as the MUTCD, to evaluate the appropriateness of traffic control devices for particular situations. The MUTCD contains guidelines or "warrants" for each type of traffic control device. The purpose of these warrants is to ensure consistency in the implementation of traffic control devices to conform to motorists’ expectations and achieve uniform driver behavior throughout the State of California. The warrants vary depending on what device is being considered. The warrants usually evaluate things like the volume of traffic, number of pedestrians, amount of travel delay, and the accident rate.
How do pedestrian signals work?
A pedestrian signal allows a safer way for pedestrians to cross the street at signalized intersections. The pedestrian signal, when activated, provides time for the pedestrian to enter the street on the steady "Walk" and to finish crossing the street on the flashing "DON’T WALK" signal. The pedestrian signal is normally activated by a push-button that tells the signal controller that there is a pedestrian who wishes to cross the street.

WALK INDICATION
The pedestrian signal sequence begins when the "WALK" signal is illuminated. This sequence is a minimum of 5 seconds long and allows enough time to leave the curb and begin crossing the street in the direction of the "WALK" indication before the flashing DON’T WALK interval begins.

In order to get the "WALK" signal, YOU MUST PRESS THE PEDESTRIAN PUSH BUTTON!!  Otherwise the signal controller has no way of knowing you are there. It is only necessary to push the button once.

FLASHING DON'T WALK
The pedestrian clearance interval consists of a flashing "DON’T WALK" signal. During the flashing "DON’T WALK", the pedestrian should continue walking. Don’t begin to cross on the flashing "DON’T WALK" signal. The clearance interval is based on the street width divided by the accepted standard of 3.5 feet per second walking time.

 Pedestrian Signal Informational Flyer
 11/5/2008 10:29:14 AM (size:1.26 MB)

STEADY DON'T WALK
The "DON’T WALK" signal, steady illumination, means that a pedestrian should not enter or cross the street in the direction of the pedestrian signal.

Please note that even when crossing an intersection with the "WALK" or flashing DON’T WALK signal, pedestrians should ALWAYS watch out for potential conflicts with vehicles. Drivers may be making right or left turns across the crosswalk and may not see the pedestrian in the crosswalk. Behavioral studies on drivers shows that nearly 40 percent either do not see or do not yield to pedestrians crossing a street.  Just because you have the right-of-way doesn’t mean you won’t get hit by a vehicle!
How do we make field changes/revisions to the plans?
  • The consulting engineer shall submit the proposed changes for review.  The changes shall be clearly shown and labeled on the plans and all departments that may be concerned with the proposed changes must approve the revision.  If the revision is deemed acceptable, then the Public Works Department will initial the original mylar sheets in the revision block and return them to the consulting engineer.  The consulting engineer will return the requested number of sets of plans to the Public Works Department for distribution to the various City departments.
  • Minor changes during construction, which do not affect the basic design of the improvements, may be made upon authorization of the Public Works Department without formally revising the plans.  These changes shall appear on the record drawings.

How is the length of yellow time calculated for traffic signals?
The City of Roseville follows both Federal and State guidelines and the California Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices for Streets and Highways (MUTCD).

The length of yellow time for through traffic movements are based on approach speeds (the 85th percentile speed from radar speed surveys).  Longer yellow times are appropriate for through lanes with higher approach speeds.  Vehicles making left turns typically have much slower approach speeds than that of through traffic lanes.  The California MUTCD Table 4D-102 suggests minimum yellow times of three seconds.  A three second yellow is typically used in left turn movements throughout the State of California.

A common misconception is to assume yellow time is “clearance time” to get through an intersection.  However, Section 4D.0410 of the MUTCD states that the exclusive function of the yellow change interval is to warn traffic of an impending change in the right-of-way assignment.  In other words, the purpose of the yellow signal is to inform approaching drivers that the light is about to turn red.

As long as a motorist enters the intersection (crosses the limit line) before the signal turns red, the motorist has entered the intersection legally.  If a motorist entered the intersection legally, he or she is entitled by law to continue through the intersection, even if the light subsequently turns red while that motorist is still in the intersection.

At some intersections where the traffic signals are synchronized with other signals along the roadway, the opposing left turn movements do not terminate simultaneously, but rather they lag one another (commonly referred to as lead-lag).  The lagging left turn movement will remain green with its associated through movement.
How long can I park on public streets?
Parking restrictions are posted at various locations throughout the city. Depending on the parking demand in the surrounding area, the time limits may range from five minutes to eight hours. By city ordinance, vehicles are not allowed to park on any public street in the city for more than 72 continuous hours without moving the vehicle. The restrictions apply to all vehicle types, including RV’s and trailers.
I am disabled and need a ride
Personal disabilities vary greatly. Roseville Transit accommodates disabled passengers for all of its services. All buses are equipped with wheelchair lifts. If you are unable to use fixed route services, Roseville Transit Dial-A-Ride services are available.
I am having a swimming pool installed and would like the construction equipment to access my backyard through the bike path adjacent to my house.
The City does not allow bike paths, designated open spaces or City landscape easements to be used for access to a homeowner’s property.
I am sick and I need a ride
Roseville Transit does not provide medical transportation services. If you are too sick to use public transit, please contact your local health care provider, a taxicab service or call 911 if you have an emergency.
I am unable to get around and need a ride
Roseville Transit provides both Local bus service and Dial-A-Ride around Roseville.

Roseville Transit
(916) 774-5757
(916) 746-1797 TDD
www.roseville.ca.us/transit

Health Express
Health Express is a no-to-low-cost transportation service providing rides for Placer County residents to and from medically-related appointments. Service to Roseville residents is available on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday afternoons only. There are no age or ability restrictions.
(800) 655-RIDE

I have a dispute with my neighbor as to the location of the property line between our homes; will the City help resolve this?
No, this is a civil issue between the two property owners and the City does not get involved.  The public can access resources at the City such as Parcel Maps and Subdivision Maps, which show property lines, but obtaining a property survey by a licensed property surveyor is the accurate way to determine actual property lines and boundaries. Private property surveys are not services provided by the City.
I need a ride to a hospital
Roseville Transit provides both Local bus service and Dial-A-Ride to local hospitals. Roseville Transit does not provide medical transportation services. If you are too sick to use public transit, please contact your local health care provider, a taxicab service, or call 911 if you have an emergency.

Roseville Transit
(916) 774-5757
(916) 746-1797 TDD
www.roseville.ca.us/transit

Health Express
Health Express is a no-to-low-cost transportation service providing rides for Placer County residents to and from medically-related appointments. Service to Roseville residents is available on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday afternoons only. There are no age or ability restrictions.
(800) 655-RIDE

I need my street address repainted
Currently there is a moratorium on private or personalized curb painting within the City of Roseville.
I need to have the colored curb repainted
Call the Street Maintenance Division at (916) 774-5790 to request the curb painting.
I want to complain about a broken sidewalk

According to State law (the Streets and Highways Code), maintenance of the sidewalk that abuts private property is the responsibility of the property owner.  If the sidewalk is damaged, it is the responsibility of the property owner to repair it, unless the sidewalk has been damaged by roots of an official city street tree (OCST).  If you or your contractor plans to repair the sidewalk that abuts your property, contact the Engineering Division at (916) 774-5339 to obtain an encroachment permit.

I want to complain about a tree limbs in the street/in my yard
For tree limbs in the street, please contact the Street Maintenance Division of Public Works at (916) 774-5790. Provide the location of the tree limbs and they will send a crew out to pick them up.

Tree limbs on private property are the responsibility of the property owner. 

I want to complain about an illegal addition on a home
To submit a complaint, call the Code Enforcement Hot Line at (916) 774-5501.
I want to complain about construction noise
Please contact the Construction Management Section of Engineering at (916) 746-1300.
I want to complain about flooding in my neighborhood
If your concern is regarding street flooding, contact the Street Maintenance Division at (916) 774-5790. If your concern is related to flooding in an existing creek, please contace the Engineering Division at (916) 746-1300 and ast to speak to someone in the Floodplain Management Section.
I want to complain about tree roots lifting up the sidewalk

According to State law (the Streets and Highways Code), maintenance of the sidewalk that abuts private property is the responsibility of the property owner.  If the sidewalk is damaged, it is the responsibility of the property owner to repair it, unless the sidewalk has been damaged by roots of an official city street tree (OCST).  If you or your contractor plans to repair the sidewalk that abuts your property, contact the Engineering Division at (916) 774-5339 to obtain an encroachment permit.

I want to know if my property is located in a floodplain
Most of Roseville is "high and dry" as less than 7% of Roseville is located in a floodplain, and most of those areas are opern space (no homes). However, there are still a few areas in Roseville that are susceptible to flooding. If you want to know if your property is in the floodplain, please contact the Engineering Division at (916) 746-1300 and ask to speak to someone in the Floodplain Management Section.
I want to replace some sidewalk in front of my house, what is required for this? 
An encroachment permit is required to do this work.  The City has a standard detail that is to be used for the construction of the sidewalk; see detail CST ST-1.  Fees, bonds and insurance are required.  The fee is calculated to be 4% of the cost of the work to be done with a $60 minimum.  If the homeowner is obtaining the permit then a bond or security of $500 is required.  If a contractor is obtaining the permit then a bond of $1000 is required.  Insurance must also be presented to our Risk Management department.
I want to report a pothole
Contact the Street Maintenance Division at (916) 774-5790 and report the location of the pothole.
I want to request a no parking zone
All requests for parking changes are to be submitted in writing on a "Traffic Study Request Form" to the Engineering Division. (A copy of the form is available at the City of Roseville's Civic Center Permit Counter or by clicking on the website link below.) If, after reviewing the information on this website, you would like a request form mailed to you, contact the Engineering Division at (916) 746-1300.

If you want to restrict parking in a residential area where overflow parking from parks, schools, or businesses continuously occurs in your neighborhood, the City has a residential permit parking program. Residential permit parking is not approved for individual homes. The City will consider permit parking when the majority of the residents along a block support the request for permit parking. Residential permit parking requires approval of the City Council. Once the permit parking is approved, each household is issued two permit placards by the Police Department.

I would like a rumble strip installed on my street
Rumble strips are not used for speed control in the City of Roseville. Rumble strips are used to alert drivers of an upcoming unexpected roadway condition. Rumble strips make noise 24 hours a day, which is why they are not used on highways located near residential areas. If you feel there is a roadway condition that warrants rumble strips, please contact the Engineering Division at (916) 746-1300 and ask to speak with someone in the Traffic Studies Section.
I would like a speed hump installed on my street
Many years ago, the City had a speed hump installation program for residential streets. The City Council discontinued the program because of too many issues and resident complaints about the humps. Some motorists would intentionally drive over the humps at high speeds creating a neighborhood nuisance, swerve onto sidewalks and front lawns to avoid the humps, or speed up between the humps to make up lost time. Some motorists would divert to other streets to avoid the humps, transferring a speeding issue from one neighborhood to another. Therefore, the City no longer installs speed humps. The City has a speed hump removal program for those who are interested in removing existing speed humps on your street. Contact the Engineering Division at (916) 746-1300 for further information.
If my project involves the closing of a public sidewalk or street, do I need pre-approval from the City?
Yes. You will need to obtain an approved Traffic Control Plan by contacting the Traffic Section in Engineering at (916) 746-1300.
Is a certain street located within the City of Roseville?
This information can be obtained by calling our office at 916-774-5339.
Is there a Dial-a-ride service?
Yes, Dial-A-Ride is a curb-to-curb, share-a-ride public transportation system and is available through Roseville Transit. 
Is there a Rideshare program?
Sacramento Area Council of Governments (SACOG) has established a regional ride matching database that can assist you in finding others with whom to carpool, vanpool, or bike to and from work. Carpooling, vanpooling, taking the train or bus - even walking and bicycling for those who live within a reasonable distance to work - are all Ridesharing commute alternatives to driving alone that reduce traffic congestion and help improve air quality. Rideshare daily, weekly, or even once in a while!
My street sign is broken, missing, damaged, or illegible
Call the Street Maintenance Division at (916) 774-5790 to report the problem.
The City is resurfacing my neighborhood street. What if it's my garbage pickup day?
Please put your garbage bin out as normal the night before your scheduled garbage pick up day. The contractor will coordinate with the Solid Waste Division to have the garbage bins emptied before the roadway is resurfaced. After the garbage trucks have emptied the bins, any bins that are on the roadway will be moved to the driveways by the contractor.
The City is resurfacing my neighborhood street. Where do I park and how do I know when they will pave my street?
No Parking signs will be posted 48 hours prior to the street closures. The signs will include the exact work dates and times. We recommend residents park their vehicles in their driveways overnight and move their cars to adjacent streets before the work begins in the morning. Please do not drive on the new road for at least 6 hours after it has been paved.
The pavement is broken
Contact the Street Maintenanc Division at (916) 774-5790 and let them know the location of the broken pavement.
The traffic lights are out
According to the California Vehicle Code, when a signalized intersection is blacked out due to a loss of power, all motorists must treat the intersection as an all-way stop.  If the signal is operating, but you notice a malfunction such as a light bulb burned out or some other problem, contact the Engineering Division at (916) 746-1300 during normal business hours. 
There's a pot hole in my street.  Who do I contact?
Contact the Street Maintenance Division of Public Works at (916) 774-5790.
What are submittal requirements for improvement plans, landscape plans, grading plans, stock pile plans, etc.?
Our Development Application lists all of the requirements for an initial plan submittal.
What are the as-built plan submittal requirements?
One set of 24” x 36” record drawing mylars, one set of 11X17 prints, one set of 24” x 36” prints and an electronic copy of the utility composite in plan view, DWG format.
What can be done about speeding in my neighborhood?
To report an in-progress, hazardous traffic situation, like a reckless driver or a suspected drunk driver, call 911 or police dispatch at 916-774-5000 extension 1.  If your concern is a chronic traffic problem, call the police department's traffic hotline at 746-1023.  The police department's traffic unit monitors the hotline and assigns traffic officers to investigate.  

Although many residents would like to see traffic officers on their residential streets, the police department must concentrate traffic enforcement on the major arterial streets where most injury collisions occur.  They also spend time around school sites, because of the higher potential of injury to children.  The department also uses speed display trailers and speed awareness signs to remind drivers to slow down. 
What can I do if the Engineering Division denies my request for a traffic control device?
Engineering staff has the authority to install traffic control devices if the MUTCD warrants are met.  Otherwise, Engineering staff cannot recommend the installation.

If staff denies your request, you may write a letter to the City Council explaining that your request has been evaluated and denied by staff, and that you wish to have this issue brought to the City Council for consideration. If the City Council wishes to consider the issue, they will direct staff to place the item on a City Council agenda, including a staff report explaining the situation and why staff does not support the request for the traffic control device.

At the City Council meeting, the Council members will consider staff opinion along with public input in order to make a final decision.
What forms of public transportation are there in the city?
The City of Roseville has two forms of public transportation as well as an extensive network of off-street and on-street bikeways:

Transit (bus) Services
Roseville Transit offers Local fixed route and Dial-A-Ride services within the City of Roseville, and Commuter service to and from Sacramento and the Highway 50 corridor. Placer County Transit and Sacramento Regional Transit also provide public transit connections to and from Roseville Transit.

Bikeways
The City of Roseville has an extensive network of off-street and on-street bikeways. View more information on the City's bikeways.

Train Services
Amtrak Capital Corridor provides train services between Auburn and San Jose, which includes a stop in Roseville.

Phone: (916) 774-5293
What happens if I need to change the design of my project during construction?
Contact staff in the Development Section of Engineering first. They can be reached at (916) 774-5339. Major changes require pre-approval by the City. The assigned Public Works Inspector must have the approved revision BEFORE the change can be done in the field.
What if a traffic signal is blacked out (loss of power)?
According to the California Vehicle Code, when a signalized intersection is blacked out due to a loss of power, all motorists must treat the intersection as an all-way stop. If the signal is operating, but you notice a malfunction such as a light bulb burned out or some other problem, please call the Engineering Division at (916) 746-1300 during normal business hours.
What if my garbage pickup day is the same day the City is repaving my street?
Please put your garbage bin out as normal the night before your scheduled garbage pick up day. The contractor will coordinate with Environmental Utilities – Solid Waste to have the garbage bins emptied before the roadway is resurfaced. After the garbage trucks have emptied the bins, any bins that are on the roadway will be moved to the driveways by the contractor.
Phone: (916) 746-1300
Fax: (916) 746-1339
What if the sidewalk is cracked or broken in front of my home or business
According to State Law (Streets & Highways Code), maintenance of the sidewalk that abuts private property is the responsibility of the property owner. If the sidewalk is damaged, it is the responsibility of the property owner to repair it, unless the sidewalk has been damaged by roots of an official city street tree (OCST). If you or your contractor plan to repair the sidewalk that abuts your property, contact the Engineering Division of Public Works at (916) 774-5339 to obtain an encroachment permit.
What is required to get an encroachment permit to place a dumpster in front of my house?
An encroachment permit application must be submitted along with a $60 fee and proof of insurance must be provided to our Risk Management department. 
What is the address of a subdivision/commercial project?
This information can be obtained by calling our office at 916-774-5339.
What is the difference between a green arrow and a round green signal indication?
A green arrow gives you the right-of-way to make a protected turn. A round green ball means you have to yield to oncoming vehicles and pedestrians before you make your turn.
What is the first step of construction once I receive my permit?
Arrange a pre-construction meeting by first calling your Public Works Inspector at (916) 746-1300.
What is the street cleaning schedule?
Residential Streets are swept approximately once every 30 days. Commercial streets are swept approximately every other week. You may call the Street Maintenance Division at (916) 774-5790 to check when your street is scheduled to be swept next.
What is the typical turnaround time for plancheck?
Typical turnaround times are 4-6 weeks for the 1st check and 3-4 weeks for subsequent checks.  These are typical times and can vary depending on the plan checker’s workload at the time of plan submittal.
What is Traffic Signal Coordination?

Traffic signal coordination is a method of timing groups of traffic signals along an arterial to provide for the smooth movement of traffic with minimal stops. The goal of coordination is to get the greatest number of vehicles through the system with the fewest stops in a comfortable manner. While it would be ideal if every vehicle entering the system could proceed through the system without stopping, this is not possible even in a well-spaced, well-designed system.

Not all City streets warrant coordination. Typically, a street is selected for coordination if it carries a certain amount of traffic along the arterial during peak hours. In most cases, coordination is active from 6:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. during weekdays. The individual signals operate on a "first-come-first-served" or traffic activated basis outside of these hours.

 

Coordination Determination 

 

Corridor coordination takes into account the spacing of the signals, the prevailing speed, the traffic volume on the corridor, the amount of traffic coming in and out of driveways between traffic signals, the uniformity of intersection sizes, and the traffic signal cycle length. Evaluating a corridor for coordination requires the following steps:

 

  1. Perform travel-time delay studies – drive the corridor several times prior to coordination to determine how long the average trip down the corridor takes.
  2. Collect current traffic volume and intersection geometry information.
  3. Create a simulation model of the corridor and compare to existing field conditions in order to insure the accuracy of the model.
  4. Run automated and manual optimization procedures.
  5. Input the new optimized timing into test controllers to verify it works.
  6. Transfer the new timing to the traffic signals in the field.
  7. Verify the new timing works well by performing a post-coordination travel-time delay study.

 

In traffic coordination, generally, "the majority rules" and the busiest traffic movements are given priority. Depending on the route, the master cycle length of an arterial could vary from 60 to 120 seconds. This means that if you were exiting a side street, and you just missed the light, it is possible to wait between 60 and 120 seconds before receiving another green light. Generally, the busier and the bigger the intersection, the longer the required cycle length.

 

Current Coordinated Corridors

 

At this time, signals are interconnected and actively coordinated on the following segments of streets in the major direction of flow.

Signal Coordination Map 

 

Results since implementing traffic signal coordination

 

Since implementing its corridor coordination program, the City of Roseville has seen a 27% reduction in travel times. This equates to a coordinated corridor combined savings of approximately 5,500 vehicle hours of travel time per day. In addition to corridor coordination, the City analyzes all of its signals for efficiency and effectiveness on a 3-year basis. Traffic signal coordination and individual signal timing are major elements in the on-going effort to improve the performance of the street system and maximize traffic flow through-out the City of Roseville. Call the Engineering Division at (916) 746-1300 for more information on traffic signal coordination.

What services does the Transportation Division provide?
The Transportation Division of Public Works is intent on providing services that will help you use alternative methods of transportation, such as transit, bicycling, carpooling, vanpooling and walking. We do this to help reduce traffic congestion and improve air quality. The primary services we provide are:

  1. Roseville Transit (planning, operations, capital improvements, education and marketing);
  2. Bikeways (planning, construction, maintenance, maintenance and marketing); and,
  3. Transportation Systems Management (working with large employment centers to reduce the number of single occupant vehicles during peak hours of traffic, including program implementation and development, training, and marketing, and park and ride lots).

 

When do I need to obtain a grading permit?
A grading permit is required if more than 50 cubic yards of dirt is to be moved.
When do I need to obtain an encroachment permit?
An encroachment permit is required any time work is to be done within the public right of way or public easement.
When will my bond or security for a grading permit be returned to me?
The grading permit bond is released when the Public Works inspector has signed off the grading permit and all work to be done with the grading plan is complete.
When will my bond or security for an encroachment permit be returned to me?
The encroachment permit bond is released 6 months after the Public Works inspector has signed off the encroachment permit.
When will my street be swept?
Residential streets are swept approximately once every 30 days. Commercial streets are swept approximately every other week. You may call the Street Maintenance Division of Public Works at (916) 774-5790 to check when your street is scheduled to be swept next.
Where can I get a map of bike trails in the Roseville?

You can optain a Parks, Trails & Bikeways Map from the Public Works – Alternative Transportation Division by calling (916) 774-5293 or e-mailing transportation@roseville.ca.us. You can also view a copy here.

Where can I get more information about trails in Roseville?
For those interested in bike routes within the City of Roseville, please visit our website to download a bike map of the City’s existing network of bike paths, lanes, and routes as well as bikeways planned for the future.  For more information, please call 774-5293.
Where do I find the City's Construction Standards and details?
The City's Construction Standards are facilitated by the Engineering Division of the Public Works Department. 

Click here to download a copy of the Construction Standards
Who do I contact regarding proposed street names for a project?
Information regarding street names should be directed to our office at 916-774-5339.
Who do I report a damaged sidewalk to?
Contact the Engineering Division of Public Works. They can be reached at (916) 746-1300.
Who is responsible for maintaining the landscaping strip between the sidewalk and curb in front of my house?
The property owner is responsible for all maintenance of this landscaping.  There are a few areas in the City in which the City maintains only the trees for pruning and health problems, but the property owner is still responsible for the day-to-day maintenance of the trees.
Who is responsible for sidewalk repairs in front of my home?
The property owner is responsible for sidewalk repairs.  From time to time the City does sidewalk repairs through an annual sidewalk, curb and gutter repair program.  To determine if your home will be part of a future program, contact our City Projects Section at 916-746-1300.
Why does it take so long sometimes for the signal to turn green?
There could be many reasons for this. Many intersections are congested and have a lot of traffic approaching from different directions. Sometimes you just have to wait your turn. If a pedestrian pushes the ped button, the WALK and flashing clearance will stay on for a certain amount of time, requiring conflicting traffic movements to have a red light. The longer the ped crossing distance, the longer the flashing clearance has to stay on. Occasionally, a fire or police vehicle, train or ambulance may preempt the signal with their strobe lights, causing the conflicting traffic movements to remain red. Sometimes it is an issue of priority, as a roadway with heavier traffic will typically have more green time than the side street with less traffic to reduce overall delay to the most number of drivers.  Some of our busier roadways have the signals synchronized during peak traffic hours, and that may cause the side street approaches to wait longer than normal.
Why doesn’t the City install "Children at Play" signs in my neighborhood?
These signs only create a false sense of security for parents and children who believe the signs provide an added degree of protection that they do not and cannot provide. Motorists pay little attention to such signs, particularly those motorists who drive the same street every day. The use of these signs has long been abandoned since these signs are a direct and open suggestion that playing in the street is acceptable behavior.
Why doesn’t the City install a crosswalk "here"?
People commonly trust crosswalks to automatically provide additional safety, and this trust has led to higher accident rates.

Studies show that many people, particularly children, view crosswalk lines as additional protection to oncoming traffic, which subsequently leads them to be less cautious when crossing the street.

For this reason, marked crosswalks are only recommended at locations where traffic is already required to stop, such as at a stop sign or traffic signal. Certain exceptions may be made on low speed, two-lane roads.
Why doesn’t the City install a stop sign "here"?
As with traffic signals, stop signs are installed after stop sign warrants are met for a particular intersection. Stop sign warrants are based on traffic volumes, visibility, and the accident rate. Many people believe stop signs are the answer to controlling speeding along streets. The MUTCD states that stop signs are not to be used as a speed control device, but to identify who has the right-of-way at an intersection. Studies have shown that when unwarranted stop signs are installed along a road, motorists soon realize that the stop signs are unnecessary, and begin to run the stop sign. This behavior could lead to an accident. Also, motorists tend to speed up after an unwarranted stop sign as they are frustrated having to stop or slow at what they feel is an unnecessary stop sign. In many cases, measured speeds have been higher between unwarranted stop signs than before the signs were installed.
Why doesn’t the City install a traffic signal "here"?
Traffic signals are recommended for installation only if the Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD) signal warrants are met. Signal warrants are based on traffic volumes, delay, pedestrian volume and the accident rate. The City also has a standard minimum spacing requirement between signals of one-quarter mile. The cost to install a traffic signal is about $200,000.
Why doesn’t the City lower the posted speed limit to slow traffic on arterial and collector roadways?
Contrary to popular belief, lowering the speed limit on a roadway will not slow traffic. Most motorists travel at a speed which they feel is appropriate given their surroundings, regardless of posted speed limit signs. The State of California has established the 85th percentile speed as the prudent speed for a roadway. That is the speed at which 85% of the motorists are traveling at or below. For this reason, state law requires speed limits be posted at the nearest 5mph increment to the 85th percentile speed in order for law enforcement to use RADAR. An additional 5mph reduction in the speed limit can be justified given certain conditions.
Why is there more debris in the bike lanes than on the rest of the city streets?
All bike lanes in Roseville are swept at regular intervals.

Due to the amount of construction going on in Roseville and surrounding areas, the bike lanes can accumulate debris in the intervening time. Often times, debris from construction vehicles and other vehicles falls on the road. Passing vehicles tend to kick the debris up, but bikes don't. The debris naturally starts to accumulate in the gutter and bike lane. (Notice: debris is heaviest in the gutter next to the curb, then gets lighter toward the outer edge of the bike lane, and is lightest of all in the auto lanes.) This can make it look as if the streets have been swept and the bike lanes haven't, which isn’t the case – it’s really a matter of how the debris gets distributed after it falls.

Drivers and bicyclists alike should note that the California Vehicle Code permits bicyclists to leave a bicycle lane, when necessary, to avoid debris or other hazardous conditions; however, bicyclists may only leave a bicycle lane when the movement can be made with reasonable safety and then only after giving an appropriate hand signal in the event any vehicle might be affected by the movement.

If you notice a problem area, contact the Street Maintenance Division at streetmaintenance@roseville.ca.us or (916) 774-5790

Phone: (916) 774-5790
Fax: (916) 774-5756
Will the City install speed humps on my residential street?
No. Many years ago, the City had a speed hump installation program for residential streets.  The City Council discontinued the program because of too many issues and resident complaints about the humps. Some motorists would intentionally drive over the humps at high speeds creating a neighborhood nuisance, swerve onto sidewalks and front lawns to avoid the humps, or speed up between the humps to make up lost time. Some motorists would divert to other streets to avoid the humps, transferring a speeding issue from one area to another. The City has a speed hump removal program for those interested in removing existing speed humps on your street. Contact the Engineering Division at (916) 746-1300 for additional information.
Will the City install speed limit signs on my neighborhood street?
State law has set the speed limit on residential streets at 25mph whether posted or not.

Unless the roadway is an entrance to a residential area from a major roadway, speed limit signs are typically not installed.
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City of Roseville 311 Vernon St., Roseville, CA 95678. Phone: 916-774-5200.
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