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Mosquitoes and the Drought
News ImageWith California’s current historical drought, there are manymisconceptions floating around about how residents should store waterand handle pools and fountains to contribute positively to the currentstate of emergency. The reality is many factors need to be taken intoconsideration, especially public health risks.

Investment in recycled water program proves beneficial during fourth year of drought
News ImageEvery day, the city of Roseville’s wastewater treatment plants capture, treat and convert millions of gallons of wastewater into recycled water.

Our recycled water program, which started in the 1990s with a single commercial customer, has since grown to become an important source of water, particularly during the unrelenting drought.


Explore Big Trucks at the Maidu Community Center
News ImageBig Trucks Summer moves over to the Maidu Community Center on Thursday, August 6 with a visit from a garbage truck! Come out to this free program for story time at 9:30am, followed by truck visits from 10-11am. Come out again on August 13 to wrap up the summer with a pipe scope truck. No registration needed for these free events!

Roseville customers cut water use nearly 40 percent in June
News ImageWater use reduction numbers for June are in and Roseville customers continue to their part by saving 39.12 over 2013 numbers.

Latest water quality report now available
News ImageWe’re pleased to present you with this annual report on city provided drinking water. As in past years, we have complied with all state and federal regulations regarding water quality. The safety and protection of our water system continues as a top priority as we regularly implement vulnerability assessment and security measures.


Take steps to protect trees while limiting landscape watering
News ImageTrees offer many benefits to people and wildlife, and are an investment one generation makes for the next. Lawn can turn golden and eventually recover. Trees, however, can be lost forever. Customers should prioritize their landscape, saving limited supplies for watering high-value trees and plants first.

What the new drought ordinance means to you
News ImageThe news is filled with stories about the drought and new requirements to reduce water use, but what it means on a personal level is not always clear. So here’s the short story on what the new drought ordinance requires of each Roseville household.

Drop-off sites offer another way to recycle
News ImageWhile your One Big Bin (see onebigbin.com) eliminates the need to separate trash from recyclables, you can still take plastic, glass, aluminum, cardboard, newspapers and expanded polystyrene (EPS) foam to one of our convenient drop-off sites.

Economic prosperity during a drought
News ImageRoseville is a progressive city, focused on providing services to our community for a smart, sustainable future. Part of that future includes recent gains in economic development as our economy recovers from the Great Recession-- all the while facing an unprecedented fourth year of drought. A telltale sign of economic recovery is increased commercial and housing growth, not only in Roseville, but throughout the greater Sacramento region and statewide. As the stress on the ongoing drought wears on, customers and stakeholders ask us: “Why do you continue to build when there is a water shortage or drought?”

Free Summer WaterSmart Gardening Workshops
News ImageWe are pleased to announce that our August workshop will now be free of charge thanks to coordination between the City of Roseville, State of California Department of Water Resources, Placer County Water Agency, City of Rocklin and EcoLandscape. In this time of drought conditions, sign up for these workshops to learn how to reduce landscape water use and how to convert thirsty lawns into beautiful beds. Sign up today!

What we recycle might surprise you
News ImageThe One Big Bin idea brings up a lot of questions. You know that you put all trash into a single container. You know your trash is taken to the Materials Recovery Facility (MRF), where machines and people sort through it to pull out recyclables. But do you know what gets recycled—and what doesn’t?

Call to save more water for Roseville customers

The City of Roseville announced additional water-use restrictions for Roseville water customers in light of Governor Brown’s Executive Order and the May 6 State Water Resources Control Board’s drought emergency action requiring increased statewide water-use reductions.

To meet the 25 percent statewide water reduction goal, City of Roseville customers are required to reduce water consumption by 28 percent over 2013, an 8 percent decrease from last year. This will require the implementation of more stringent drought provisions.

For residential customers, the most noticeable change includes watering day restrictions for outdoor irrigation. Watering days for residential turf will be limited to two days per week, Monday and Friday only, before 10 a.m. and after 8 p.m. Commercial customers will have watering days limited to Monday and Thursday.



VIDEO: Not your grandparent’s landfill
News ImageOnce upon a time, people simply dug big holes and threw in every kind of trash imaginable. When that hole was full, they dug another one. Today, we’re very careful about how we design and build landfills and are much more cautious about what we throw into them.

Spring planting and your sewer
News ImageWe flush or wash things down the drain and they disappear, right? That’s all most of us know (or want to know) about sewers. But what you don’t know about sewer systems can hurt you. Sewer line backups and overflows are serious health hazards and they’re painfully expensive to clean up. Among the most expensive repairs to a sewer service is from damage caused by tree roots growing inside sewer pipes.

Water use down in March nearly 19 percent
News ImageRoseville customers continue to reduce water use as the state endures a fourth year of a drought. March numbers show that residents and businesses have reduced water use by nearly 19 percent over this time in 2013. Since the start of the year, water consumption in Roseville is down 14.9 percent.

What the lack of Sierra snow means to Roseville
News ImageThink of a glass of water with a full pitcher standing by for refills. That’s a good picture of the relationship between Folsom Reservoir and the Sierra Nevada snowpack before the drought. Rain and runoff from local creeks filled the reservoir during the winter months. As temperatures warmed, the melting snowpack sent down a steady stream of water to refill the lake as more than a half million people used its water for drinking, washing, irrigating, etc. and government agencies released it downstream for the environment.


Roseville school district exchanges turf for water wise landscape
News ImageA Roseville school district recently completed a project that is expected to save a lot of water. Most recently, staff replaced thousands of square feet of turf at the Roseville Joint Union Unified High school District offices on Cirby Way, thanks in part to the City’s Cash for Grass Program.

E-Waste — Electronics Are Not Trash!
News ImageYour unwanted e-waste should not end up in your trash bin. Instead, bring old electronics to the Roseville Utility Exploration Center and we’ll recycle them for free! Although we no longer accept televisions, we are happy to take computers, monitors, printers, cell phones, stereo equipment and wiring/cables.

Beat the leak: Find and stop leaks fast
News ImageSmall drips in your home can quickly add up to many gallons lost. A dripping faucet can waste 15 to 20 gallons a day. A steady leak – from a hole only 1/16th inch in size – can add up to more than 1,000 gallons of water wasted each day.

Customers achieve a more than 20 percent water savings in February
News ImageCustomers took action last month and saved 20.13 percent compared to the same time in 2013. With the recent news of a less-than-stellar snow pack, which is a critical piece to our water supply puzzle, efficient water use is paramount.


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